Posted 1 day ago

Rudolf Steiner believed that the soul abandons the body when the body is no longer attractive to it.

"How can it happen that the spiritual impulse, and especially the inner schooling for which you are constantly providing stimulus and guidance bear so little fruit? Why do the people concerned give so little evidence of spiritual experience, in spite of all their efforts? Why, worst of all, is the will for action, for the carrying out these spiritual impulses, so weak? I was particularly anxious to get an answer to the question as to how one could build a bridge to active participation and the carrying out of spiritual intentions without being pulled off the right path by personal ambition, illusions, petty jealousies, for these were the negative qualities Rudolf Steiner had named as the main inner hindrances. Then came the surprising and thought provoking answer. ‘This is a problem of nutrition. nutrition as it is today does not provide the strength necessary for manifesting the spirit in physical life. A bridge can no longer be built from thinking to will and action. Food plants no longer contain the forces people need for this.’

A nutritional problem which if solved, would enable the spirit to become manifest and realize itself in human beings! With this as a background one can understand why Steiner said that “the benefits of the biodynamic preparations should be made available as quickly as possible to the largest possible areas of the entire earth for the earth’s healing.”

An account of a question Ehrenfried Pfeiffer posed to Rudolf Steiner from “The Birth of a New Agriculture, Koberwitz, 1924

The Science of Biodynamic Agriculture by Hugh Lovel

Posted 1 day ago

Years ago when I started gardening it was called Companion Planting. Now it’s called an insectary when we intentionally interplant a vegetable garden with plants and herbs that repel pests, and attract beneficial insects and pollinators. Here, fruit trees were underplanted with Chives and Comfrey, Carrots seeded near Rosemary, the Pine tree needles provide good mulch and protection for Strawberries, and Nasturtium in spring is great to repel aphids. We have the indispensable Catmint, Verbena, Salvia and Fennel, the Perovskia, and there is a mass planting of Lavender and Echium around the perimeter. This pretty habitat for helpful bugs keeps the biodynamic garden healthy.

Posted 1 day ago

The biodynamic garden has thrived all through the dry summer, still harvesting abundant tomatoes, with a new crop coming up.

Posted 1 month ago

In our Southern California- Mediterranean climate the best way to store water is in the soil. We are now building our Kitchen Garden terraces, on contour, to increase water infiltration, to conserve moisture and to mitigate erosion between terraces. Each terrace will have a shallow swale running through the middle where any runoff water will soak into the soil. The swale will become a mulched pathway, as mulching will also slow the water evaporation. It’s a classic rainwater garden recipe.

Posted 4 months ago
This is the best ever book about composting because it is charming, playful, deeply poetic, philosophical, scientific, practical, simple and accessible, and something for the whole family. By appealing to children, the author manages to break it down for all of us, like glacier on rock. Leavening poetic euphemism, ‘the circle of life’, with blunt prose, ‘Everything living or dead has something that will eat it’, and  other provocative statements for adult contemplation such as, ‘Rotting is nature’s way of recycling the goodness’, either one of which one can imagine in the mouth of an aging roué, Ben Raskin’s handy book sparks our immediate interest. Read more

This is the best ever book about composting because it is charming, playful, deeply poetic, philosophical, scientific, practical, simple and accessible, and something for the whole family. By appealing to children, the author manages to break it down for all of us, like glacier on rock. Leavening poetic euphemism, ‘the circle of life’, with blunt prose, ‘Everything living or dead has something that will eat it’, and  other provocative statements for adult contemplation such as, ‘Rotting is nature’s way of recycling the goodness’, either one of which one can imagine in the mouth of an aging roué, Ben Raskin’s handy book sparks our immediate interest. Read more

Posted 5 months ago

Our Compost/Mulch pile was built with Sacred Cow biodynamic compost, wood chips mulch, well composted horse manure, topsoil and a hand full of sweet lime. To stimulate the compost with proper forces, we inserted into the pile a set of six biodynamic preparations: yarrow, chamomile, stinging nettle, oak bark, dandelion and valerian. The biodynamic compost that is made in the spring is applied to the garden in the fall, and compost made in the fall is applied in the spring.

Posted 5 months ago

SOIL NEWS! SOIL NEWS! SOIL NEWS!

Fresh batch of the fabulous Sacred Cow biodynamic compost arriving in a few weeks…in May!

While we wait,  here is some quick advice for all you spring gardeners who want to to enliven your garden soil: go for genuine biodynamic preps, easy to mix and to apply as tea, and to great benefit. Easy to prepare, easy to order from the Josephine Porter Institute for Applied Biodynamics. http://www.jpibiodynamics.org

I highly recommend that you spray this very beneficial combination of BC compound preparation (Barrel Compost) and #BD500x (prepotentized Horn Manure). Stir them separately then spray together on soil, in the late afternoon, on a Root day. Your garden will thank you. Detailed instructions are included with the package. If you need more guidance… Ask Me basia@basiakenton.com

Posted 7 months ago

We are preparing to plant a 1/4 acre Kitchen Garden in Malibu with veggies, fruit trees and flowers. After 2 months of intense program spraying with biodynamic preparations to bring life to the soil, the soil was opened up, and sprayed again with horn manure. And then…we were in luck- it rained. Last week we added some Sweet Lime, then biodynamic compost, and a thick layer of mulched organic woody matter, then covered it all with straw and watered well.

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Posted 8 months ago

Prince Charles has been championing sustainability in the most practical ways for decades. A dedicated organic farmer for 30 years at his Highrove Estate in Gloucestershire and his Duchy in Cornwall, whose products, Duchy Originals, have been consistently turning a profit; his experimental, progressive methods, including Biodynamics (since 2005), has finally caused his critics to shut up and take note.

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Posted 9 months ago
The Biodynamic garden some 4 weeks after planting - it is thriving! Young seedlings of cover crops are pushing up along the wall where the Tomatoes will be planted in Spring.